Lekmokulka
aleksyandr
Okej, so I have done a lot of work on this since I last posted about it in the conlang community back in March of 2009. I need to now digitize it and get it up both here and in that community. Just searched through the archives and found the old info that WAS available. That I have posted below, earlier tonight, and will be getting new (well, relatively) material up regarding Lekmokulka soon.

(no subject)
aleksyandr
Most preverb-verb combinations are a fixed part of the lexicon; new combinations cannot usually be created
freely. But there are a few preverbs that are very productive and can be combined with many different
roots, and some roots will accept almost any preverb.
In some dialects preverb-verb combinations have been made which are not common in other areas, creating
words for actions which are not known to the entire speaking community but only to one dialect-area.
For example, for one clan of the Tselulka (meaning: We Exist,
working name for the Tribe of people who speak Lekmokulka)
who encounter a waterfall in their territory, where waterfalls are not commonly known in other areas of
Tselulka habitation. Say for example, many people climb in to a small cavern behind the waterfall and
this water-falling action which the water does is important to their daily routine.
Well, by now they have created a verb with some meaning such as
Sukwulekmoksom = water + to splash (fish + hear) + to move = (literally) To Water-splash/To Waterfall


MORE TO COME regarding tense, mood, aspect, etc. as I figure out how I want it to be...

(no subject)
aleksyandr
I was working on Verb creation and verbs the last day or two...This is some of my notes/what I have so far....
Incidentally I came up with a working name for the Conlang, Lekmokulka and the Conculture Tselulka

here are the notes:

Verbs

Lekmokulka (working name for the language meaning: we hear/ we are hearing) verbs are built from a
few hundred verb roots. There is only one conjugation class, although there are some irregular Verbs due to phonetic constraints.

A large class of modifying prefixes, or preverbs, are used to create verbs with specific meanings.
Many preverbs are noun classifiers as well. For new Verb creation often old Verbs are simply added to with a new
secondary root verb at the word-final position. Alternately, to change the meaing slightly of a Verb
a new modifying prefix can be added word-initially to create new meaning.
For example, the verb root shesh- means "hunt/forage/to acquire food" when used by itself, while kwushesh- means
"to fish/go fishing". The preverb kwu- (which corresponds with the noun classifier of the same pronounciation
which means "water animal") is used with verb roots to form verbs that have something to do with water
animals. Preverbs are sometimes reduplicated for emphasis or to create a meaning distinction.
Reduplication in sensory related preverbs often, but not always, implies something negative.
For example lekmok = to hear, leklekmok = to have a headache (see below for details)

kwushesh= To Fish
kwukwushesh=To Hunt Whale
som = To Move
susom= to move in water
sususom=to swim.
tsel = To be/Exist,
metsel = To Be Animal-like/In A State Of Wildness
tsotsel = to be human,
tsotsotsel = to be a good person/share with others
lyetsel = to be nearby
lyelyetsel = to be here (precisely)
mok = to percieve
lekmok= to hear
leklekmok = to have a headache (lit. to hear too much. believed to be hearing the vibrations
of the earth coming from the spirit realm, which humans are not
meant to percieve but which for various reasons cross through
to this world-reality from time to time in the form of vibrations
in people's heads).
tsolekmok = to hear a person coming in the woods/distance
melekmok = to hear an animal nearby/coming
hlolekmok = to hear birds
kwulekmok = to splash (from hearing the sound of fish when they jump and splash in the water)
tsohlolekmok = to imitate bird sounds while hunting to communicate with other hunters
tsotsyamok = to want to hear a loved one/friend/to miss someone (who is not kin)
tsoshitsyamok = to want to hear a loved one/family member/to miss someone (who is kin)
damok = to feel (with one's skin, esp. hands or feet)
dadamok = to feel pain in one's hands or feet
tsodadamok = to feel pain (all over the body), to hurt generally
dadalyemok = to feel pain near one's hands or feet (arms/legs)
sudamok = to feel with one's feet specifically while walking barefoot in the water
pushmok = to see
pushpushmok = to cry
hakamok = to taste
hakahamok (irregular reduplication) = to burn/be spicy/taste bad
gush=to ingest
sugush=to drink
megush=to eat meat
klogush=to eat plants,
hlogush=to eat fowl/bird,
kwugush=to eat fish
kwukwugush=to eat whale
myegush=to eat something inedible
pwyegush= to eat a poisonous plant
myemegush= (irreg. reduplication) to be starving/to have nothing to eat/to be so hungry
that one is willing to eat dirt and rocks
sumyehlosom= to run on the beach with the spray from the ocean flying up like a bird and
hitting oneself (or someone else).

etc
aleksyandr
I like the sound more, is all. The plural of Birch (white + trees) Naru + ga + ga = Narugaga

etc.

I've also been working on Root Verbs and how those are going to be constructed.

The Root Verb endings are -sh, -k, -m, -b, -l and are all single morpheme. They can begin with any Consonant and follow a CvC pattern with occasional exceptions as CvCvC in some Root Verbs.

Examples are: -gush = to ingest, -mok = to percieve, -som = to move, -beheb = to know/understand (irregular), -kakab = to speak (irregular), -tsel = to be/exist, -shesh = to hunt/forage.

These Root Verbs can be used on their own or with modifying Preverbs.

Using this pattern, and knowing that not all options will be used, I am expecting about 200 Root Verbs to which the modifying Preverbs can be attached to create more complex Verbs.

Conlang
aleksyandr
I started conlanging, if that is the correct terminology, long before I knew anyone else had ever done it. I was about 10 and spent most of my time in the woods. It was very basic then, but developed until I was a bit older before I heard of Tolkien, Esperanto, etc. and learned more about it all. I began studying linguistics regularly at around 14 and working on Conlangs from that point on.
Some of them are lost, some are still around in handwritten notes strewn about in boxes and pads of paper. It has been a few years since I have had the time or inspiration to work on anything new, or old for that matter. A few weeks ago I began working on a new one, found this Conlang group, and recently created a Livejournal account so I could join.

I have been doing a lot of work on a new Conlang, like I mentioned above. It is a posteriori in some ways, as I am experimenting with some interesting features of little-known/endangered natural languages. However, the grammer is, on the whole, a priori: that is, of my own creation. It is a sort of experimental language. I am working on mythology, and some story lines, and this whole concept for some writings etc. and want this language to be a part of the work in some fashion.
I am not really ready to give any examples or description of the grammar for this language yet; it is not ready. Nonetheless, I will give a broad-based description of what I am experimenting with so far but know that it may change wholly or in part at any point.
Note: I am very interested in phonetics and phonemes, as well as sound change, and will likely drift away from the current phonemes for this language as I play with ideas.

Some Basic Aspects:
Currently the phonemes are very basic, but will be shifting, I am sure...
Consonents: p, b, s, sh, t, ts, d, k, g, l, n, m, w, h, r,
Vowels: a, e, i, o, u, y
IPA transcription will come later as I play with this...It is not even remotely set in stone at this point.


Excepting the phonemes the first, most basic, aspect of this language is that it is going to be my attempt at a in between stage of an inflectional and agglutinative language with an SOV (Subject-Object-Verb) word order.

Nouns are created from root morphemes strung together, a large lexicon of which is in the making, and has much room for expansion. There are classifiers which are the last morpheme in each noun that define the noun class to which the noun belongs. This is used solely as a descriptive classifier and is does not express anything but the information about what it (the thing, i.e. Noun), inherently, is.
Examples:
ocean = large + ancient + water classifier
ocean = wakwytyaksu / wakwy + tyak + su

child(Masc.)= small + male + human classifier
child(Masc.)= mahonwatso / mah + onwa + tso

These are two simple examples of this process. The morphemes, root words, which create these Nouns are often adjectives but can be other Nouns as well as basic root words. This gives, although complicated, many apparent lexical opportunities when dealing with new concepts, places, and things. For example if a person speaking this language came across a grove of birch trees which had never before been encountered by anyone within their realm of experience they could, perhaps, call it:

white + tree + grove + location classifier
narugashemlye / naru + ga + shem + lye
(in the above example naruga is the noun for "white birch" which will be aparent in the following example).

or it could be:
new/most immediate + birch (white + tree classifier) + grove + tree classifier
suwanarugashemga / suwa + naruga + shem + ga

amongst many other options. These are two examples of possible names for this birch grove, the second of which is obviously more cumbersome.

However, due to this root morpheme string-along, if you will allow me to call it such, there is the opportunity for very long words. There is a tendency to always choose the simpler option if one is available. Despite the many possibilities most nouns are already set in stone, as they say, and other possibilities are no longer options.

I have never created Nouns with this sort of process so we shall see if it ultimately succeeds or fails - anyone have experience with this? What works? What doesn't? I'm a little rusty here...haha.

As for Verbs, that is where the inflectional aspect is going to come in...it will be something like the language has lost all inflection except in certain aspects of the Verbs. Still working on this, but I am interested in working on something which has a set of root verbs and a large class of modifying prefixes, or preverbs, that would be used to create verbs with specific meanings.


Also, adjectives follow the nouns which they modify (excepting in the root morphemes of Nouns in noun creation/etc.), postpositions are the norm, and auxilery verbs follow the action verbs.

As I type this out, as it has mostly been in scratchings on paper and in my head, I am starting to see some issues which need fixing, especially in the root morpheme based noun-creation.
Modifications to this process are likely necessary.


I want to work with Reduplication as a major aspect of the language as it has always appealed to me. Still toying with the manner in which I want to use it.

Perhaps pluralization of Nouns by reduplicating the classifier?
For example:

child(Masc.)= small + male + human classifier
child(Masc.)= mahonwatso / mah + onwa + tso

child(Masc. Plural) = mahonwatsotso

Anyone like/dislike this idea? I was also considering the possibility of something along the lines of reduplication of the initial morpheme?
which would make: child(Masc. Plural) = mahmahonwatso


Am I just wasting my time, or is there something here that could, perhaps, work?

I think there is but as I said, early early stages and there is much to do...Comments/constructive criticism greatly appreciated.

the times
aleksyandr
Stuff will go here...

The last few days...
aleksyandr
The last few days have been rather busy. I am so glad that I have my girlfriend, she is quite wonderful. Really. I mean it. Your girlfriend is nothing compared to mine. Hah sorry that was rude.

In any case, she is gorgeous, great, fun, and even when she's being bitchy I love her.

By being bitchy I don't mean to be rude to her, she has been sick with nausea, vertigo, stomach and head aches and it has really upset her, made her emotional and snappy. But it is okay. I love her so much that it really doesn't matter to me. I just try to take care of her and do the best I can to make her feel better and to help her.

I had to take her to the hospital the other day, where they did a CAT-scan but found nothing wrong. That is good and bad. I am glad nothing is wrong, but it's too bad they couldn't figure out what is making her sick.

I have been doing a lot of work on a new conlang. It is a posteriori in some ways, as I am experimenting with some interesting features of little-known/endangered natural languages. However, the grammer is, on the whole, a priori: that is, of my own creation. It is a sort of experimental language. I am working on mythology, and some story lines, and this whole concept for some writings etc. and want this language to be a part of the work in some fashion.
I am not really ready to give any examples or description of the grammar for this language yet; it is not ready. Nonetheless, I will give a broad-based description of what I am experimenting with so far but know that it may change wholly or in part at any point.
Note: I am very interested in phonetics and phonemes, as well as sound change, and will likely drift away from the current phonemes for this language as I play with ideas.

Some Basic Aspects:
Currently the phonemes are very basic, but will be shifting, I am sure...
Consonents: p, b, s, sh, t, d, k, g, l, n, m, w, h, r,
Vowels: a, e, i, o, u, y
IPA transcription will come later as I play with this...


Excepting the phonemes the first, most basic, aspect of this language is that it is agglutinative with an SOV (Subject-Object-Verb) word order.

Nouns are created from root morphemes strung together, a large lexicon of which is in the making, and has much room for expansion. There are classifiers which are the last morpheme in each noun that define the noun class to which the noun belongs. This is used solely as a descriptive classifier and is does not express anything but the information about what it (the thing, i.e. Noun), inherently, is.
Examples:
ocean = large + ancient + water classifier
ocean = wakwytyaksu / wakwy + tyak + su

child(Masc.)= small + male + human classifier
child(Masc.)= mahonwatso / mah + onwa + tso

These are two simple examples of this process. The morphemes, root words, which create these Nouns are often adjectives but can be other Nouns as well as basic root words. This gives, although complicated, many apparent lexical opportunities when dealing with new concepts, places, and things. For example if a person speaking this language came across a grove of birch trees which had never before been encountered by anyone within their realm of experience they could, perhaps, call it:

white + tree + grove + location classifier
narugashemlye / naru + ga + shem + lye
(in the above example naruga is the noun for "white birch" which will be aparent in the following example).

or it could be:
new/most immediate + birch (white + tree classifier) + grove + tree classifier
suwanarugashemga / suwa + naruga + shem + ga

amongst many other options. These are two examples of possible names for this birch grove, the second of which is obviously more cumbersome.

However, due to this root morpheme string-along, if you will allow me to call it such, there is the opportunity for very long words. There is a tendency to always choose the simpler option if one is available. Despite the many possibilities most nouns are already set in stone, as they say, and other possibilities are no longer options.

Also, adjectives follow the nouns which they modify (excepting in the root morphemes of Nouns in noun creation/etc.), postpositions are the norm, and auxilery verbs follow the action verbs.

As I type this out, as it has mostly been in scratchings on paper and in my head, I am starting to see some issues which need fixing, especially in the root morpheme based noun-creation.
Modifications to this process are likely necessary.

had to do this....not too surprised, actually.
aleksyandr
I am:
John Brunner
His best known works are dystopias -- vivid realizations of the futures we want to avoid.


Which science fiction writer are you?




I am not very surprised by this. John Brunner is one of my favorite Sci-Fi authors.
Fun little quiz, although after I got my answer I changed a bunch to see who else they have for options as "who you are" you know? Well, I was very offended that Ayn Rand was on there. Scamming good for nothing....I'll stop now.
Anyhow, I thought I was going to sleep.

Cheers.

Today
aleksyandr
I had a very...interesting day today. It was quite nice, actually. Except for waiting at the hospital for hours for my girlfriend. I was glad to do it, and happy to go up there with her- I was just worried. It makes me sad that she feels sick so much. I don't know what to do.
I love her so much. It's just difficult, and I suppose I have to learn to deal with difficulties in life. I just hope that she feels better.
They didn't figure out what was wrong. Ah....well, she goes to the doctor's tomorrow so perhaps they will sort it out.

I am rather tired and feel that it would be best if I were to go to sleep.  That, therefore, is what I shall do.

Cheers.

Bwuah?
aleksyandr
I am sitting on the couch, my girlfriend Courtney is asleep, wrapped up in a red woolen blanket next to me.
My spineless cactus is getting some sun in the windowsill, and I need to put the orange juice away.
I am listening to good music, and delaying organization and cleaning up my apartment.
Thought I would continue to update this livejournal for my own devices, as I imagine no one else is reading it.
How about an extremely inflectional language? Or agglutinative? I can't decide. I've tried agglutinive before....
Maybe something along the lines of Finnish or Estonian? We shall see...They are both very inflected, and I enjoy that.

Cheers 

?

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